Archive for the ‘Obesity’ Category

Did you know if your lifestyle is primarily sedentary (a lifestyle of no or irregular physical activity – you know…bed, shower, couch, desk, couch, bathroom, couch…), your metabolism just stops?¬†The same thing happens when you slam the brakes on the car (or abruptly squeeze the wrong brake on the mountain bike).

James A. Levin, MD, PHD, (professor of medicine at Mayo) says the moment you go from walking slowly to sitting, your active calorie-burn rate (those calories burned when one’s body is at rest) drops from 3 to 1 per minute (I am certain I hit a historical low with negative numbers). At the same time, your triglyceride & blood sugar levels rise. Sitting for hours day after day after day after day reduces the levels of your “good” cholesterol (aka HDL), and your body packs on the pounds. The pounds aren’t sole effect: heart disease, diabetes, various cancers, longevity of life (or lack thereof), and your family are all at risk.

Dr. Levine came up with a program called NEAT (nonexercise activity thermogenesis…I like the anagram better). It’s super simple. NEAT forces you to rethink all of your habits and find new, more active ways to get through your day. Dr. Levine says if you move enough, you could offset the danger of sitting all of the time.

Nothing will ever take the place of a challenging workout. But if your lifestyle is one that barely moves, get up & wiggle it…just a little bit. You might be surprised what happens!

Start

If you got time to watch all the shows you DVR’d for the past week, cuddle a hangover, eat pancakes, watch cartoons, play video games, catch a movie, have kids to corral or dogs to herd, you got time to workout. I know this to be true…I used to weigh almost 400 pounds.

One day the excuses will run out…or you’ll get tired of the shrill sound of my voice. It’s a lot easier to chase your grandchildren, nieces or nephews, or your own babies when you aren’t tied to a 300 pound brick.

Today I had Boot Camp Solo. I invited 42 people, 1 said “yes”, nobody showed. Yay. ūüė¶

My “gym” of choice was at Butler Elementary in Huntington Woods. A small spot with two baseball fields, short bleachers, a little play park, a track, trees, a water park (I did not go there). It was the perfect morning: sun out, in the high 60’s. Best part was when I rode my bike out into the middle of the baseball field. I didn’t see the sign about no bikes for a good 20 minutes.

Saturday Workout:

Road Cycle: 6.05 miles round trip w/10lb pack (72.2 & 98.4 gains)
Bleachers (run up & down): 25 reps x 5 (125 total)
Push Ups: 25 reps x 5 (125 total)
Squats: 25 reps x 4 (100 total)
Mountain Climbers (I used the bleachers for handles): 60 reps x 4 (240 total)
Track: jogged/walked 4x

According to my little body monitor: I moved 6,797 steps for 3.5 miles (not including the bike ride); I was active for one hour and fifty-six minutes, I was idle for 8 minutes. I burned 2,326 calories | active burn was 1,736 calories | resting burn is 590 calories.

hwpark

huuuuuhI love to share my unexpected moments of shame with the world. Like the day my pants fell down at the gym; or the day I slid seven feet to the floor off a Stair Master (twice); or the day my water bottle fell off the spin bike and exploded on the floor (that was my first spin class…my second was seven months later); or the day I had an all out brawl at Kohl’s in the lingerie (long-er-ay) section with Spanx (you know those were meant to be stepped into, not pulled over like a super big compression wrap?).

So I thought to invite you- the readers of Sneaker Porn Diaries, those who follow, and those who would never admit to following but they do – what’s your silly weight loss story?

The deadline for the Silliest Story…Like…Ever contest is July 15th, 2013. Submit your stories to sneakerporndiaries@yahoo.com using the following format:

Please put “SNP Silly Story Contest” in the subject line of your email.
Please keep your stories to no more than 700 words, check spelling and punctuation.
Be sure to include your before & after picture, and a picture of your favorite pair of sneakers.
Share your starting & current weight, age, city & state where you live.
First names and the first letter of your last name will be shared on the blog if your story is chosen.
If you have a blog, please include the blog address so your journey can be viewed by other readers!

Deadline for submissions is July 15th, 2013. The Silliest Story winners will be announced on July 20th, 2013. And yes, there will be a PRIZE!

Somewhere across the country there’s a secret collective of post-op dairy farmers. They haven’t been clear on their target market, or the cost of their product to consumers when it officially hits store shelves. One thing is clear: confidential sources have revealed they’re milking it for all it is worth.

Ugh.

Piece of advice: if you fell off the post-op salad truck, STOP posting, ‘What do I DO???” all over the internet. If you are a weight loss surgery post op for any length of time (two seconds, two months, two years, two decades), you¬†know what you are supposed to do…unless of course you were hit on the head with fried Twinkies. Then you could be suffering from WLSPOA (weight loss surgery post op amnesia).

To avoid becoming a POW, try the following steps:

1. Talk to someone. You have a primary care doctor, you have a surgeon, you have a nutritionist. If any of these professionals have mysteriously vanished out of your life (alien abduction?)…FIND SOMEONE NEW. If you’re unable to do so then my assumption would be you reside on an island in total solitude, which means you have no access to communications and will not read this anyway.

2. If you know you’re eating habits are bad, and you know you have consumed that which you probably are not supposed to (like a container of crispy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies from Trader Joe’s), get over it. It’s summer. You can grow stuff. Even better, you can pay someone who grew it already.

3. If you have the phrase “I can’t afford to” flashing behind your eyelids in reference to item #2, hold your tongue. Chances are incredulously high you have, oh let’s see: all the cable channels, all the movie channels, a smart phone and a big ol’ plan.

I whine to a select few of my friends, none of whom give me one ounce of slack because they’ve been privy to my weight loss changes. I don’t complain online all that often. Usually I will talk to someone who puts me in my place. I also yell at people. Ask my friend Anne. I chased her bum back across the football field at boot camp a few weeks ago for short-cutting the track, later I made her do half leap frogs. My trainer gives me no slack at all-and it has nothing to do my picture he put on his car advertisement. It’s because he remembers when I was the fattest woman in the gym, how my stomach drug the ground during push ups, or how 40lbs made a world of difference in climbing 17 steps.

God, you have so much to celebrate. Don’t be a POW. Don’t focus on the prison and the chains…neither hold you anymore.

If that doesn’t encourage you, get stuck somewhere. I got wedged in that little space there between the bed and nightstand over the weekend to fix the carpet. I hadn’t laughed that hard at myself in a long, long time.

smallspotigotstuckin

shoeLast June I decided I was going to try out the StairMaster at the candy store gym.

With determination driven by sheer purpose (I think I can, I think I can, I think I can) I strode across the gym. Tucked at the end of the last row of cardio paraphernalia were a handful of StairMaster machines. A lady was on the end unit, the second was empty, a gentleman was on the third one.

Second thought…the use of “gentleman” is premature.

I stuck my water bottle in the water bottle hole. Draped the smelly towel my membership entitled me to use for free over the hand rail¬†(which smelled like it had been buried in a garbage can); got my playlist together (that’s code for I un-knotted my earphones), and finally with a cocky sense of purpose (know-it all-ness) I climbed upon the machine. Seven feet in the air I pushed the settings through to the program I wanted and pressed start (quick tip: what you set the elliptical to does not apply to the StairMaster. You might want to write that down.).

I made a mental note that the heart rate figures I inputted were most likely wrong because the stairs started to move¬†very¬†rapidly, simulating – oh, I don’t know – how¬†one might run¬†up a flight of stairs!¬†I made a go of it and attempted to get my footing while I desperately searched for a warning label that would have given some detail as to¬†why¬†my feet weren’t fitted to the steps. I also made another mental note:¬†write Nautilus a letter which would state a warning label that shared the bottom step disappears would be vital…and lifesaving.

I knew I needed to stop the machine and start over. I grabbed the top of the rail to pull myself up. My foot slipped off a step and as I¬†slid¬†down the length of the machine I uttered loudly, “You have GOT to be kidding me.”

The lady to the right and the gentleman to the left never moved. They continued to stare ahead and climb to their destinations.

I managed to get myself together and got the machine to cooperate. 30 minutes later I had logged 95 floors. I’m not entirely certain how floors are determined, but I don’t care. I did it.

Afterward I hit the elliptical, and got grossed out when the little skinny chick next to me left the machine and didn’t clean it.

Eew.

slotmachineIf you are one of the hundred of thousands of women who jump on and off of a scale multiple times (i.e.¬†all.day.long.), here’s a tip: install a quarter slot on the wall above the scale. Every time you step on the scale, insert a quarter. Bet you’re a millionaire by the end of the day.

Well, maybe not.

In addition to the rapid weight loss experienced by post-ops during the first year to year and a half after weight loss surgery, the need to weigh oneself constantly throughout the day (every day) can (and usually does) become a substantial problem. It’s called scale obsession, and we allow our attitude for the day to be completely dictated by what number ticks by on the little square under our feet.¬†To some degree it’s a little funny. Seriously – who in the world would have thought¬†scale obsession would be the addiction which replaced cartons of ice cream, quarter pounders, chips, M & M’s or (insert your food of choice here)…

Stand on the scale one too many times and you will allow it to define who you are:¬†Darlin’ you are entirely too fat. Look. At. You. A whole pound in six hours – what¬†were you thinking? Anxiety, negativity, feeling like a failure – none of this is conducive to a healthy body image. We already feel insecure with our body changes, why add to the baggage cart?¬†Your weight will fluctuate throughout the day due to water weight/retention, a holiday or birthday indulgence (or chocolate attack at the office), pooping (yes…pooping), muscle mass, etc.

I am not a scale person – it doesn’t portray a clear picture of my weight loss. ¬†The 33.5 inches I’ve lost in the last 24 months do.

Before you step on your scale again take a picture of yourself, then place it next to the picture of your former self. No scale can make you feel that good.

 

You CAN workout…so get off your ass.

To workout or not to workout had never been a question, it was a decision made before I crawled out from between the covers in the morning. My weight loss doctor would ask me naggingly constantly if I had been to the gym. Three months of that led me to hire a personal trainer for six weeks just to keep him quiet. I thought I’d outsmart him with reverse psychology.

Six weeks later, I ate the proverbial crow pie: 17″ and 25lbs lost.

I have learned there is no valid excuse not to workout.

  • I am way too busy. If you watch American Idol, The Voice, and The Walking Dead with religious vigor‚Äď AND you DVR those shows (or others), you got the time.
  • I can’t do what people half my age do.
    Really? Madonna Buder has competed in over 45 triathlons. She started training when she was 48 years old. Her first Ironman was at the age of 55. In 2005 she completed the Hawaii Ironman at 75, she was the oldest woman ever to finish the race. Ironman adds new age brackets as she continues to compete. She’s best known as “The Iron Nun”.
  • Nobody will workout with me. Not true. You can find a workout buddy, they’ll challenge you and you can motivate each other. Ask my friend Anne, last summer we spent almost every weekend together at Weekend Warrior Boot Camp. She recently turned 59 (again). Just this weekend I chased her around the football field.
  • Working out is boring. Not if you add variety. Not everyone has to run. There’s the elliptical, rowing machine, Zumba (you brave, brave souls), spin, kickboxing, yoga, cross fit‚Ķthe list is endless. Playlists are a big help, too!
  • I have kids, they take up all of my time. They don’t take up all your time (they sleep, right?). Get up early , or workout after they are down for the night. If they are babysat by TV, movies and video games, turn them off and get outside. Play sports, go to the park, hit the beach, hike, bike, walk, run, or create a Family Boot Camp. You’ll get some quality time with your kids and together model a healthy lifestyle.
  • My back/knees/hips/elbows/fingernail hurts. I sprained my back during a training session one night. Stairs hurt my knees. Running irritates the muscles which wrap around my left hip. My left shoulder has been dislocated twice, presently I have a fracture that’s three or four years old and a torn muscle. I have to have a total knee replacement. What’s your excuse?
  • I’m too fat, I can’t workout. That’s better translated to “I’m too fat, I don’t want to workout.”
  • I’m not overweight. What? You thought this was just for fat people? Not all skinny people are fit people. Exercise is just as beneficial for skinny people as it is for fat people.
  • My friend is a gym rat, there ain’t no way. My therapist said I would become a “gym rat”. A friend of mine who lost over 200lbs by living in the gym would workout three to four hours a day. I thought they were both nuts. I have since digressed. I usually spend no less than two hours working out.
  • My (insert illness here) makes it hard to get around. Talk to your physician, who will tell you to move. The Government says cancer survivors, those with arthritis, have had a stroke, have Parkinson’s, are mentally ill, even those who are disabled can all benefit from exercise.
  • I’m depressed. Great! Studies have strongly suggested regular exercise is helpful in fighting off depression!

You don’t have a valid excuse, so get off your ass and take a walk!