Posts Tagged ‘obsessions’

Hey, check out the workout of the day!

What did YOU do??

http://spfitdet.com/2013/08/23/friday-wod/

 

Only Your Best. No Excuses. Never Quit.

Only Your Best. No Excuses. Never Quit.

If you got time to watch all the shows you DVR’d for the past week, cuddle a hangover, eat pancakes, watch cartoons, play video games, catch a movie, have kids to corral or dogs to herd, you got time to workout. I know this to be true…I used to weigh almost 400 pounds.

One day the excuses will run out…or you’ll get tired of the shrill sound of my voice. It’s a lot easier to chase your grandchildren, nieces or nephews, or your own babies when you aren’t tied to a 300 pound brick.

Today I had Boot Camp Solo. I invited 42 people, 1 said “yes”, nobody showed. Yay. ūüė¶

My “gym” of choice was at Butler Elementary in Huntington Woods. A small spot with two baseball fields, short bleachers, a little play park, a track, trees, a water park (I did not go there). It was the perfect morning: sun out, in the high 60’s. Best part was when I rode my bike out into the middle of the baseball field. I didn’t see the sign about no bikes for a good 20 minutes.

Saturday Workout:

Road Cycle: 6.05 miles round trip w/10lb pack (72.2 & 98.4 gains)
Bleachers (run up & down): 25 reps x 5 (125 total)
Push Ups: 25 reps x 5 (125 total)
Squats: 25 reps x 4 (100 total)
Mountain Climbers (I used the bleachers for handles): 60 reps x 4 (240 total)
Track: jogged/walked 4x

According to my little body monitor: I moved 6,797 steps for 3.5 miles (not including the bike ride); I was active for one hour and fifty-six minutes, I was idle for 8 minutes. I burned 2,326 calories | active burn was 1,736 calories | resting burn is 590 calories.

hwpark

Somewhere across the country there’s a secret collective of post-op dairy farmers. They haven’t been clear on their target market, or the cost of their product to consumers when it officially hits store shelves. One thing is clear: confidential sources have revealed they’re milking it for all it is worth.

Ugh.

Piece of advice: if you fell off the post-op salad truck, STOP posting, ‘What do I DO???” all over the internet. If you are a weight loss surgery post op for any length of time (two seconds, two months, two years, two decades), you¬†know what you are supposed to do…unless of course you were hit on the head with fried Twinkies. Then you could be suffering from WLSPOA (weight loss surgery post op amnesia).

To avoid becoming a POW, try the following steps:

1. Talk to someone. You have a primary care doctor, you have a surgeon, you have a nutritionist. If any of these professionals have mysteriously vanished out of your life (alien abduction?)…FIND SOMEONE NEW. If you’re unable to do so then my assumption would be you reside on an island in total solitude, which means you have no access to communications and will not read this anyway.

2. If you know you’re eating habits are bad, and you know you have consumed that which you probably are not supposed to (like a container of crispy oatmeal chocolate chip cookies from Trader Joe’s), get over it. It’s summer. You can grow stuff. Even better, you can pay someone who grew it already.

3. If you have the phrase “I can’t afford to” flashing behind your eyelids in reference to item #2, hold your tongue. Chances are incredulously high you have, oh let’s see: all the cable channels, all the movie channels, a smart phone and a big ol’ plan.

I whine to a select few of my friends, none of whom give me one ounce of slack because they’ve been privy to my weight loss changes. I don’t complain online all that often. Usually I will talk to someone who puts me in my place. I also yell at people. Ask my friend Anne. I chased her bum back across the football field at boot camp a few weeks ago for short-cutting the track, later I made her do half leap frogs. My trainer gives me no slack at all-and it has nothing to do my picture he put on his car advertisement. It’s because he remembers when I was the fattest woman in the gym, how my stomach drug the ground during push ups, or how 40lbs made a world of difference in climbing 17 steps.

God, you have so much to celebrate. Don’t be a POW. Don’t focus on the prison and the chains…neither hold you anymore.

If that doesn’t encourage you, get stuck somewhere. I got wedged in that little space there between the bed and nightstand over the weekend to fix the carpet. I hadn’t laughed that hard at myself in a long, long time.

smallspotigotstuckin

slotmachineIf you are one of the hundred of thousands of women who jump on and off of a scale multiple times (i.e.¬†all.day.long.), here’s a tip: install a quarter slot on the wall above the scale. Every time you step on the scale, insert a quarter. Bet you’re a millionaire by the end of the day.

Well, maybe not.

In addition to the rapid weight loss experienced by post-ops during the first year to year and a half after weight loss surgery, the need to weigh oneself constantly throughout the day (every day) can (and usually does) become a substantial problem. It’s called scale obsession, and we allow our attitude for the day to be completely dictated by what number ticks by on the little square under our feet.¬†To some degree it’s a little funny. Seriously – who in the world would have thought¬†scale obsession would be the addiction which replaced cartons of ice cream, quarter pounders, chips, M & M’s or (insert your food of choice here)…

Stand on the scale one too many times and you will allow it to define who you are:¬†Darlin’ you are entirely too fat. Look. At. You. A whole pound in six hours – what¬†were you thinking? Anxiety, negativity, feeling like a failure – none of this is conducive to a healthy body image. We already feel insecure with our body changes, why add to the baggage cart?¬†Your weight will fluctuate throughout the day due to water weight/retention, a holiday or birthday indulgence (or chocolate attack at the office), pooping (yes…pooping), muscle mass, etc.

I am not a scale person – it doesn’t portray a clear picture of my weight loss. ¬†The 33.5 inches I’ve lost in the last 24 months do.

Before you step on your scale again take a picture of yourself, then place it next to the picture of your former self. No scale can make you feel that good.